Types of Invitations & Printing

When designing your wedding invitations, it’s important to remember that the type of ink and printing method you use can be an effective part of the artistry of your invites.

Here are some of the most common categories of printing invitations:

Digital (Flat printing)

Digital printing is the most common, cost-effective, and simplest printing method available.
It’s pretty similar to the laser printer you have at work, except that most industrial digital printers are gigantic, and can handle printing on
a wider range of thicker cards & paper!
Digital printers have come a long way and can produce a pretty wide range of rich colors.

Cards can cost as little as R10 per piece when ordering in bulk.
You can upgrade with a great variety of specialist papers that we offer. See photos below of our paper range.

Digital White Printing

We are able to offer white ink and full color ink printing on colored paper, envelopes, acrylic signs and invitations as well as wood.

It costs a little more than regular digital printing, but creates a beautiful effect! By printing white ink and then printing color on top, you can also get a rich print job at a relatively economical price (especially for those wood and acrylic invites!).

Digital Foiling

This is a type of printing that uses heat to adhere foil to paper. It’s a cheaper alternative to true stamped foil (plate method). Unlike stamped foil (below), digital foil is completely flat, and the detail isn’t as crisp, and only some papers like to be foiled
this way. It is also limited in combining prints such as colour printing with foil – where this would be printed twice to reflect both options.

The pros are that you can do once-off jobs without breaking the bank.

Letterpress

Letterpress is a very traditional method of applying colour to paper. It uses metal plates to press the ink onto the paper. The process leaves an impression behind, giving anything printed with letterpress an cool imprinted texture. Plus, letterpress printing requires thicker paper than for normal digital printing – our cotton papers go up to 900gsm (like hard board!). Cotton paper is the most primary choice among letterpress printers.

Each metal plate is designed for only one ink at a time, which means, the cards have to be printed once for each color. Of course, because each card requires a new custom metal plate, and because each card has to be fed into the letterpress machine, cards printed this way can run around R85 per card for one colour. Many couples and designers find the cost to be worth it for the character it adds, but usually limit the colors to one or two. It is a very unique process and can
only be quoted per job.

You can also combine flat printing and letterpress to create something with more color variety and texture.

Metallic inks are available for letterpressing.

This same method is used for creating embossing on invitations.

Foil Stamping (Plate method)

Foil is a great way to add some glam to any invitation! Foil adds class and brightens up the design with metallic flare. It catches the light in a way ink doesn’t. Foil also comes in
a wide variety of colours!

Foil is usually applied the same way as letterpress, using a metal plate to press the design to be foiled into the paper with an adhesive agent.

Bonus: Combine printing types to save on cost. If you really want foil or letterpress, get one color done and do the rest in digital printing. This way you can have the best of both worlds. 

 Costing depends on what would need to be foiled, the size and amount of presses/cards.

Laser Cut

If you really want to make an impression, you can get your invitations laser cut. This technique uses no ink, but instead cuts away paper to create the design and the words. Intricate laser cutting looks like lace and makes a big first impression!

For laser cutting, the price depends on how long each piece takes to cut. So the more intricate the design, the more it’ll cost. Your paper also depends on the final costing, while we prefer to laser cut wood, perspex and metallic papers, we are
also able to cut on normal printed papers – there are slight burn marks on lighter papers such as white/ivory.

Our die-cutting is produced this way.

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